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[논문] Matthew’s New David at the End of Exile: A Socio-Rhetorical Study of Scriptural Quotations (by Nicholas G. Piotrowski)
ISBN13: 9789004326781
Publication Date: September 2016
Copyright Year: 2016
Imprint: BRILL
Main Series: Novum Testamentum, Supplements
ISSN: 0167-9732
Volume: 170

Abstract

Matthew crowds more Old Testament quotations and allusions into the prologue than anywhere else in his gospel. In this volume, Nicholas G. Piotrowski demonstrates the narratological and rhetorical effects of such frontloading. Particularly, seven formula-quotations constellate to establish a redemptive-historical setting inside of which the rest of the narrative operates. This setting is defined by Old Testament expectations for David’s great son to end Israel’s exile and rule the nations. Piotrowski contends that the rhetorical effect of this intertextual storytelling was to provide the Matthean community with an identity—in a contentious atmosphere—in terms of God’s historical design for the ages, now fulfilled in Jesus and his followers.

Table of Contents

1 Introduction

2 The Effect of Isaiah’s Narrative World in Matthew 1:18–25
Matthew 1:23 in Context
The Narrative Function of the Formula-Quotation in Matthew 1:22–23
Isaiah 7:14 in Context
Matthew’s Conversation with Isaiah

3 The Effect of Micah’s Narrative World in Matthew 2:1–12
Matthew 2:6 in Context
The Narrative Function of the Formula-Quotation in Matthew 2:5–6
Micah 5:1, 3 in Context
Matthew’s Conversation with Micah

4 Exile and David in the Late Second Temple Cultural Encyclopedia
A Taxonomy of Exile in the Late Second Temple Cultural Encyclopedia
End of Exile as a Davidic Hope in the Late Second Temple Cultural Encyclopedia
Returning to the Text of Matthew

5 The Effect of Hosea’s and Jeremiah’s Narrative Worlds in Matthew 2:13–21
Matthew 2:15, 18 in Context
The Narrative Function of the Formula-Quotations in Matthew 2:15, 17–18
Hosea 11:1 in Context
Jeremiah 31:15 [lxx 38:15] in Context
Matthew’s Conversation with Hosea and Jeremiah

6 The Effect of the Prophets’ Narrative World in Matthew 2:22–23
The Narrative of Matthew 2:22–23
Narrative Function of the Formula-Quotation in Matthew 2:23
The Provenance of the Ναζωραῖος
“The Prophets’ ” Expectation of the 161 נצֵֶר
Matthew’s Conversation with “the Prophets”

7 The Effect of Isaiah’s Narrative World in Matthew 3:1–4:11
The Unity of Matthew 2:22–4:12
Matthew 3:3 in Context
The Narrative Function of the Formula-Quotation in Matthew 3:3
Isaiah 40:3 in Context
Matthew’s Conversation with Isaiah
Summary and Conclusion

8 The Effect of Isaiah’s Narrative World in Matthew 4:12–17
Matthew 4:15–16 in Context
The Narrative Function of the Formula-Quotation in Matthew 4:14–16
The Narrative of Isaiah 7:1–9:6 Revisited
Matthew’s Conversation with Isaiah

9 Conclusion
Summary
Coherency and Cogency
The Socio-Rhetorical Effect on Matthew’s Church